Interview: Matt Estock on Kingdom Bash

Interview: Matt Estock on Kingdom Bash

There a ton of indie games that have crafted a fantastic couch multiplayer experience: From Glass Knuckle’s Thief Town, to Chainsawesome Games’ Knight Squad, there’s no shortage of games where you can sit down and duke it out with some friends over your preferred beverage. However, there are very few, if any, local multiplayer games that give you this experience, while also giving you a single player game and a co-op experience, all delivered in a nostalgic aesthetic that’ll make you feel like you’re back in the golden age of 16-bit.

Kingdom Bash is one of those games. And it’s all being made by one guy. AND it’s good; Like, REALLY good.

Kingdom Bash is absolutely stuffed full of content, with 5 versus & co-op multiplayer modes, 4 current playable characters, 23 different arenas, a half dozen different monsters to deal with and an absolutely wonderful chiptune soundtrack., which you can download and play right now. It remarkable to have a game with so many features, working so solidly and it’s only in Alpha!

We had the opportunity to talk with Kingdom Bash‘s solo developer Matt Estock recently to discuss how he balance the game’s many modes, his inspirations and what drew him to the world of Indie Game Development.

 

 

Our thanks to Matt for taking the time to talk with us, share his story, and open up about the development process of Kingdom Bash.

As stated, you can download Kingdom Bash right now on itch.io, so get bashing!

 You can check out our older Indie Dev Interviews to learn more about the stories behind a whole host of other indie games, as well as the motivations of the people that make them. Comment, like and subscribe to our YouTube channel if you find them interesting and want more!

 

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Editor-in-Chief of IndieHangover.com. With a soft spot for epics, sagas and tales of all types, Jacob approaches games as ways to tell stories. He's particularly interested in indie games because of the freedom they have to tell different stories, often in more interesting and innovative ways than Triple A titles.

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